Home Insulation

denver-home-insulation

The approach to insulation has always been that more is better. At some point, this is wrong!

Why Should I Add Insulation?

The leading cause of energy loss in a home is inadequate insulation. Adding insulation to your attic or walls will help keep your home cool in the summer and warm in the winter. You will save money on your utilities and your home will be more comfortable with an even temperature throughout the house.

How Much Insulation Do I Need?

The amount of insulation needed is determined by the type of R-value insulation you use. For loose fiber insulation such as cellulose, multiply the R-value of your insulation by 3.7 to get the depth in inches needed. For fiberglass insulation multiply the R-value of your insulation by 3.2 to get the depth needed.

In the video below, Casey measures the insulation of a Denver attic. He tells us how REenergizeCO will increase the level of insulation in the attic to qualify for the Denver Energy Challenge.

What Type of Insulation Do I Need?

The climate in Denver varies drastically! One day it could be 70 and sunny and the next day 20 degrees. The US Department of Energy has set a recommended R-value for different climates and heat source. Denver requires a higher R-value than an area that does not share our cold weather such as Phoenix or San Diego.

If you live in Colorado and you use electric heat, it is recommended you use R-49 in your attic, R-22 in your walls, R-19 in your basement and R-25 in your floors.

If you use natural gas to heat your home, it is recommended you use R-49 in your attic, R-18 in your walls, R-11 in your basement and R-25 in your floors.

We install both Cellulose and Fiberglass insulation for attics, walls, and floors of homes and small businesses along the Front Range and Mountain towns. The leading cause of energy loss in a home is inadequate insulation. Adding insulation to your attic or walls will help keep your home cool in the summer and warm in the winter. You will save money on your utilities and your home will be more comfortable with an even temperature throughout the house.

Facts:

Cellulose v.s. Fiberglass Insulation:

Cellulose and fiberglass are like Pepsi and Coke. They are competing products. Both do the same job, and both are tested under rigorous standards before they are sent out from the manufacturing plant. It is REenergizeCO’s company standard to add cellulose to existing cellulose or fiberglass to existing fiberglass in an existing attic environment. That is just a rule of thumb, we endorse both products and we happily install them both for the same price in any application.

Insulation is measured by its “R” Value or Resistance Value:

The definition of R-value is resistance value of the insulation in regards to how much heat can move through it. The greater the R-value the more heat you can keep in your home during the winter. Or how much heat you can keep out in the summer. Attic R-values are measured by the inch. 1” of fiberglass has an R-value of 2.7 while 1” of cellulose has an R-value of 2.8. Current R value codes range from R38 to R60 in most attic spaces. Current code for above grade 2×4 walls is R13 and 2×6 walls is R19. In layman’s terms, the higher ‘R-value’ insulation has, the greater effect it will have against heat transfer.

For loose fiber insulation such as cellulose, multiply the R-value of your insulation by 3.7 to get the depth in inches needed. For fiberglass insulation multiply the R-value of your insulation by 3.2 to get the depth needed.
The climate in Denver varies drastically! One day it could be 70 and sunny and the next day 20 degrees. The US Department of Energy has set a recommended R-value for different climates and heat source. Denver requires a higher R-value than an area that does not share our cold weather such as Phoenix or San Diego.

Gas vs Electric Heated/Cooled Homes:

Gas heated homes need insulation as much as electrically heated homes do. The big difference is that electrically heated homes are more expensive to heat because the cost of electricity is higher than the cost of gas. The greater the R-value of insulation in any home the less the electric or gas heating/cooling element has to run to keep it warm or cool.

If you live in Colorado and you use electric heat, it is recommended you use R-49 in your attic, R-22 in your walls, R-19 in your basement and R-25 in your floors. If you use natural gas to heat your home, it is recommended you use R-49 in your attic, R-18 in your walls, R-11 in your basement and R-25 in your floors.

Attic insulation:

Your attic space is the area above the ceiling and under the roof. It is typically dark, dirty and unless your house was built in the 2000’s or later it is under-insulated. There are many types of insulation for attic spaces, but the 2 we will highlight today are Cellulose and Fiberglass. Both products are “blown in” meaning we have machines that are in trailers that grind up the insulation into loose fill and we power it through a hose into the attic and evenly distribute it over the area to a pre-determined R value. The definition of R-value is resistance value of the insulation in regards to how much heat can move through it. The greater the R-value the more heat you can keep in your home during the winter. Or how much heat you can keep out in the summer. Attic R-values are measured by the inch. 1” of fiberglass has an R-value of 2.7 while 1” of cellulose has an R-value of 2.9. Current R value codes range from R38 to R60 in most attic spaces.

Wall insulation:

Exterior walls are insulated; interior walls are not. When exterior walls are built without insulation or are under-insulated we want to fix that. There are various methods to insulate an already built and drywalled wall, but we only endorse one way. We use a 4” hole saw and we cut into each vertical wall bay (from the inside) every 16” in the middle of an 8’ wall, and in the middle of the 16” cavity. This allows us to use a trailer mounted machine with PSI air pressure and a 2” fill hose in the 2×4 or 2×6 wall cavity to DENSE PACK the space with fiberglass for two reasons. We want no air movement in the wall so the insulation is packed so tight inside the wall cavity that it is an air barrier, then we want as much R value as possible in the cavity. Current code for above grade 2×4 walls is R13 and 2×6 walls is R19.

Insulation pricing can be found here

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